Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Unit 8: Managing ICT Projects Unit 7: Using Database Software (Exam) UNIT 9 WEBSITE DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT A2 class notes pass papers


Applied ICT
Key Stage 5 students have the option to follow the AS and A2 Edexcel Applied ICT course.

WHAT WILL I STUDY?
Students of the Edexcel GCE in Applied ICT will learn how to use appropriate ICT tools and techniques to carry out investigations, handle data, solve problems and manage projects. The AS qualification develops students’ communication and decision-making skills, while the A2 level introduces students to key aspects of the ICT practitioner role

Title of course: Edexcel AS Applied ICT
Entry Requirements: BTEC Level 2 in ICT, GCSE ICT C or above or equivalent
What is Edexcel AS Applied ICT? All Edexcel GCE qualifications in Applied ICT are designed to give learners broad skills, knowledge and understanding of the ICT sector. In particular, they will encourage learners to develop:

• A broad range of ICT skills and knowledge of the uses of ICT in vocational contexts, as a basis for progression into further learning in ICT-related fields, including progression from AS to A2
• Knowledge and understanding of the components, functions and applications of information systems within a range of organizations
• An understanding of the main principles of solving problems using ICT and development of the skills necessary to apply this understanding. In addition, Advanced GCE specifications encourage learners to:
• Apply their knowledge and understanding of ICT and use skills (e.g. planning, research, evaluation, problem solving) in vocational contexts
• Develop an understanding of the impact of information systems on organizations’ personnel, policies and practices
• Develop project management skills and an understanding of the need to work with others. What can I do at the end of the course? This qualification supports progression into further education, training or employment. Appropriate further education might be:
• A BTEC Higher National in Computing
• A BTEC Foundation Degree in Computing
• A degree in computing, IT or related fields. The qualification is not designed to prepare learners for direct entry into employment. How the applied course will delivered?
All Single Award Advanced GCE qualifications in this suite comprise six equally-weighted units and contain an Advanced Subsidiary subset of three AS units.
The AS is the first half of a GCE course and contributes 50 per cent of the total Advanced GCE marks. The A2, the second half of the Advanced GCE, comprises the other 50 per cent of the total Advanced GCE marks. The guided learning hours for the three-unit Advanced Subsidiary GCE (Single Award) are 180. The guided learning hours for the six-unit Advanced GCE (Single Award) are 360.


Year 1
Unit 1: The Information Age (application to use: FrontPage)
We are living in an age in which an enormous amount of information (television broadcasts, text messages, photographs, news reports and emails) is produced, communicated and stored in digital format every day. The pace of development is very fast. In this unit, you will learn about the information communication technologies that enable people to access and exchange information and to carry out transactions anytime, anywhere. This unit is internally assessed.
• Online Services: Looking at the different Online Services that is available on the Internet e.g. emails, education e-commerce etc
• Life in the Information Age: This will look at how people lives are affected by the Information Age e.g. Working Styles, Communication, Banking and Shopping etc.
• The digital Divide: Looks at how technology affects society and the difference between countries in respect with technology. This topic also looks at ways to bridge the gap of the digital divide e.g. Political, Social
• E-book: This topic looks at how to create an E-book to report you finding of the Information Age. A choice of application could be used for this e.g. FrontPage, Word, and PowerPoint etc. Topic for

Unit 2: The Digital Economy (application to use: Database AND FrontPage)
Paperless transactions are hallmarks of the digital economy. In the global e-marketplace, transactional websites are the interface between e-enabled customers and organisations, allowing them to do business with one another anytime, anywhere. Enhanced connectivity underpins the growth of the digital economy. In this unit, you will investigate how organisations are responding to the pressures of the e-marketplace. This unit is internally assessed.
• Information in modern organisation: This topic looks at how diferent organisations uses ICT
• Doing business on the web: Looking at how Transitional website does business on the web
• Running a transitional Website: what is involved in running a Transitional website, looking at how information is flowed and the process leading to an online purchases
• E-customers: This looks at the shop front, ways in which the transitional website uses to attract and retain customers
• Designing the back office database: creating an Organization Chart showing how the transitional website works
• Building and using a database: Build a relational database and creating Queries and Reports
• Data and the Law: Looking at the different laws that have come into place as well as the risk to PERSONAL DATA on the Internet

Unit 3: The Knowledge Worker (applications: Spreadsheets)
In this Information Age computers and communications technology provide many of us with access to vast quantities of information. As ICT users, we need to make judgements about sources and accuracy of information and be able to select and manipulate information to support sound decision making. In this unit, you will learn about making informed decisions using the knowledge available to you. This unit is externally assessed.
• Collecting information: You need to be able to collect information and predict outcomes from the said data
• Analyzing information: Being able to study a scenario and Identify and understand the problems
• Using and reefing a Model: When given a skeleton Model is able to import data and refine the model using the given Scenario

Year 2
Unit 7: Using Database Software (Exam)
In this unit you will develop your knowledge of, and skills in using, databases further. You will learn the principles of data modelling and sound database design, and will use relational database software to build working database systems capable of storing large quantities of data and of handling both routine and one-off requests for information. This unit is externally assessed.
In this unit you will develop your knowledge of, and skills in using, databases further.
• You will learn the principles of data modelling and sound database design
• Relational database software to build working database systems capable of storing large quantities of data and of handling both routine and one-of requests for information.

Unit 8: Managing ICT Projects
This unit will introduce you to some formal project management tools and methods and give you an opportunity to use specialist software to plan and monitor projects.
You will be able to put into practice what you have learnt by setting up and running a small-scale software project. You will have to draw on the knowledge and skills you have learned throughout the course in order to plan for and produce the required software product. This unit is internally assessed.
• This unit will introduce you to some formal project management tools and methods
• Give you an opportunity to use specialist software to plan and monitor projects.
• Setting up and running a small-scale software project

Unit 10: Using Multimedia Software
In this unit you will increase your understanding of the features and possibilities of these and other tools so that you can combine them to produce well-designed multimedia products that communicate your ideas effectively. This unit is internally assessed.
• Your work for this unit will culminate in the design, development and testing of an interactive multimedia product for a specified target audience.
• You will establish the functional requirements of the product at the outset and carry out formative evaluation and testing throughout its development. You will learn the importance of seeking and making use of feedback from others to help you in your work.
• The summative evaluation of your work for this unit will include a self-assessment of your current skill level and an indication of what else you need to know or be able to do in order to further
UNIT 9 WEBSITE DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT A2
UNIT 10 MULTIMEDIA TECHNOLOGY A2
UNIT 11 APPLICATION SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT A2
UNIT 12 VISUAL PROGRAMMING A2
UNIT 14 IMPLEMENTING a BUSINESS SOLUTION

WHAT ARE THE OPPORTUNITIES AFTER A LEVEL?

The specification has been developed for students who wish to progress to higher education or to the world of work, where understanding how ICT can be used in society and organisations, and the implications of its use, will be a valuable asset.
This booklet will give you advice on preparing for these A2 coursework units. A2 

UNIT 8 DATABASE DEVELOPMENT A2 UNIT 8 DATABASE DEVELOPMENT
This unit is meant to demonstrate your understanding of the importance of database technology and develop database skills. It will show your knowledge of database technology and modelling concepts.
You will need to demonstrate skills such as normalisation to 3NF, relational database structures, querying databases and the development of a relational database model. You will have to design, implement, test and document a database solution to a problem of your choice. You must show evidence of project management skills. The documentation you present in your portfolio should have a professional feel to it and should demonstrate an appropriate style for work at this level. 

YOUR COURSEWORK PORTFOLIO SHOULD BE BOUND APPROPRIATELY.
In this Unit you must produce a working relational database system which you have designed to meet your user’s specified requirements. It is strongly recommended that your portfolio should be presented using the following format and headings: Candidate Record Sheet This document should be signed by both you and your teacher. Contents Page If you choose to include a contents page with accurate page numbers it will significantly enhance your work. It will demonstrate a style commonly found in reports of this nature. Working database system
 The project should begin by you giving an in depth description of the current system as it exists. This should set the scene for the work that is to follow. Before you can build a new system, you must thoroughly understand how the current system works. This section should describe in detail what the current system does and what problems it contains. (It is possible to show this using DFD (symbols are listed on Page 84 of the specification) which display the context and overviews of the current system.) Users Needs Based on your investigation of the current system, a clear statement of users’ needs should be listed. As far as possible these should be quantitative.

Examples of users needs: ƒ The system should produce a report for all customers who are more that 60 days overdue in their payments. ƒ The system should be able to list all customers who live in Lisburn and are under 21 years of age. ƒ The system should list all the appointments for all employees for each working day. ƒ The system should allow new users details to be entered. ƒ It will be possible to find out a complete customer order history from this system. ƒ It will be possible to find out details of an order if an order code is input 

A2 UNIT 8 DATABASE DEVELOPMENT Examples of user’s needs that should avoided include: ƒ The system will be fast ƒ The system will find a record in 10 seconds ƒ
The system will be user friendly ƒ The system will use macros to print out reports ƒ The system will use complex queries to …. ƒ The system will use tables to hold data or similar non-quantitative objectives or objectives that use technical language. Remember these objectives are a ‘wish list’ of what the user wants and so should be expressed in non-technical lay-persons language. The reason for producing the users requirements in a quantitative list is that it will allow, in the evaluation section (later), you to comment on whether the requirements were met (or not). Project Plan This is a plan that you should set out at the beginning of your work. It will be a programme of activities and resources you will use within a timeframe over the life time of the project design. You should use a recognised project management tool to document this. An example of a project management tool would be a GANTT chart (examples of GANTT charts can be found on the exemplar paper 7 Investigating Systems (a synoptic unit)).
See CCEA website at http://www.rewardinglearning.com/development/qualifications/gce/docs/suppo rtdocs/appliedict_unit7_exemplar_paper.pdf Other Gantt chart examples can be found at: http://www.ganttchart.com/. It is also possible to use EXCEL as a project management tool – see http://office.microsoft.com/en-ca/assistance/HA010346051033.aspx 

A2 UNIT 8 DATABASE DEVELOPMENT Design specification This section of your report should show ‘bottom up’ data modelling activities you have carried out to produce your database design. ƒ Data Normalisation This will include listing all your data and applying a bottom up process known as data normalisation. You should apply the normalisation process up to 3NF only.
 See http://www.doc.mmu.ac.uk/STAFF/P.Quick/normal4.ppt ƒ
Entity Relationship modelling This section of your report should show ‘top down’ data modelling activities you have carried out to produce your database design. See http://db.grussell.org/section004.html It is important to emphasise here that you must develop and name your entities and also name the relationships between them. Both of these activities are known as logical design models. These data modelling processes are used to produce the same physical model i.e. a model that will include tables and relationships. Output Design This section will include the design of your final physical model. Processes This section will include the processes that your system will use to achieve the user requirements. It will describe how data is manipulated to produce output. Implementation This is final evidence that your system has been finished and is working. You will need to produce annotated screen dumps of your application i.e. screen dumps on which you describe what is going on. Only code you have written yourself should be annotated and included. (Please do NOT include pages of code which has been produced by the code generator!)

A2 UNIT 8 DATABASE DEVELOPMENT User Documentation This is a separate document which you will produce for a naïve user to allow them to use the system. This naïve user will be assumed to have no knowledge of your system. This naïve user should NOT be able to amend or have access to raw data. For some advice on this see http://www.klariti.com/technical-writing/User-Guides-Tutorial.shtml You must also provide evidence that THREE users have tested your system using your user guide. You must also evaluate how your system meets its original objectives. This could be evidenced by a signed questionnaire. Technical Documentation This is a separate document which you will produce to allow a TECHNICAL user to maintain or upgrade the system. Technical Documentation is written for people will maintain the system once it is installed and being used. Remember - All systems evolve. This means that the user will need the system to do things better, faster or even in a different way. Some things may have even been overlooked or forgotten. The user will only realise that improvements need to be made once they start using the system. Maintaining the system means keeping it running well and doing what the user needs it to do. Technical guides may use technical language and system diagrams if they are needed. Examine http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technical_communication A technical Guide may include the following: ƒ Technical details such as the type of system being used – technical details such as type of computer system, RAM, printer etc. ƒ Explanations may include o how to load the software, upgrade a sub-system, make a user interface, add fields, validate and verify data, amend the database structure, fault find etc. o How to produce a query or report. o How to edit a macro or change some code. ƒ You may also put in a FAQ section or contact details (email support address, web site support address, telephone support line numbers.)

A2 UNIT 8 DATABASE DEVELOPMENT You must also provide evidence that THREE users have tested your system using your technical guide. You must also evaluate how your system meets its original objectives. This could be evidenced by a signed questionnaire. Test Documentation You should provide a comprehensive test plan with evidence that testing has been carried out. Test plans should include evidence of: ƒ Navigation ƒ Data capture ƒ Data manipulation ƒ Data output ƒ Reports produced Evaluation This section is where you describe your solution and reflect on how it meets the quantitative user requirements specified at the beginning. It should comment on the data modelling and this section should also report on future improvements. You must also mention how your time management skills were used as well as the interaction between yourself and the user while you developed your data models. There should be evidence of discussion of your project plan and the use of project management tools. Statements such as ƒ ‘My user wanted the following requirements …(the list)….’ which is then followed by an in depth discussion of these requirements is good practice. Remember – it may not have been possible to satisfy all users’ requirements – why? – maybe this something for future consideration? ƒ You should concentrate on your initial project management plan – did everything go according to plan – do you deliver when you said you would?– if not? - why not? – did things take longer than expected? – why? – were there any unforeseen events that slowed the project ?– what were they and how did you cope or catch up? ƒ You should reflect on the future of the project – are there any enhancements that you could add later – give reasons for them. ƒ Statements such as ‘I thought I did well. There were no real problems at all’ should be avoided – it is unrealistic to expect everything to run smoothly. ƒ Statements such as ‘Everything was fine, but if I had to do it again I’d do it differently’ should also be avoided. It’s contradictory.

A2 UNIT 9 WEBSITE DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT 
This unit allows you to demonstrate your skills in developing and designing websites using appropriate tools. You will demonstrate your knowledge about performance issues, how you’ve used a range of media and how you have developed interactive features. You should show evidence of advanced and or dynamic content on both your website presentation and management. You should show evidence of developing, testing, documenting, maintaining and evaluating websites. You should show evidence of project management techniques. The documentation you present in your portfolio should have a professional feel to it and should demonstrate an appropriate style for work at this level. YOUR COURSEWORK PORTFOLIO SHOULD BE BOUND APPROPRIATELY. 

In this Unit you must produce ƒ a project plan that describes how you will manage your time and resources and how you will schedule the activities involved. ƒ
 A professional website that fully meets the needs of client - a business or official organisation. It is strongly recommended that your portfolio should be presented using the following format and headings: Candidate Record Sheet This document should be signed by both you and your teacher. Contents Page If you choose to include a contents page with accurate page numbers it will significantly enhance your work. It will demonstrate a style commonly found in reports of this nature. Feasibility of the project There should be a detailed investigation of the clients’ current business and you should investigate your clients’ requirements for the website. It is important to discuss these requirements thoroughly and present the client with a well presented written outline. This outline should include a portfolio of ideas and an outline of site structure, making reference to timescale and financial costs.
You must remember that the client will consider you to be the expert so it is essential you provide technical information such as domain and hosting issues in an easy to understand format. Storyboarding is evidence of good practice. This site should include advanced content such as dynamic scripting or media and be suitable for the audience concerned. This task will give you experience of planning a website implementation for a client as well as looking at methods that allow the site to be managed directly by the client.


A2 UNIT 9 WEBSITE DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT 
Project Plan This is a plan that you should set out at the beginning of your work. It will be a programme of activities and resources you will use within a timeframe over the life time of the project design. You should use a recognised project management tool to document this. An example of a project management tool would be a GANTT chart (examples of GANTT charts can be found on the exemplar paper 7 Investigating Systems (a synoptic unit)). See CCEA website at http://www.rewardinglearning.com/development/qualifications/gce/docs/suppo rtdocs/appliedict_unit7_exemplar_paper.pdf Other Gantt chart examples can be found at: http://www.ganttchart.com/. It is also possible to use EXCEL as a project management tool – see http://office.microsoft.com/en-ca/assistance/HA010346051033.aspx

A2 UNIT 9 WEBSITE DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT 
Site specification The site specification should include the following sections: ƒ Audience considerations. ƒ Domain Name and Hosting Issues ƒ Site Management Issues ƒ Site Structure Ideas ƒ Dynamic content requirements (e.g. scripted content) Dynamic content is content generated by some server process e.g. a list of web sites matching the search criteria on a search engine site, the content of a shopping cart on an e-commerce site, a personalized news page, a message on a bulletin board or the result of a database query. Before it is sent to the browser, the dynamic content needs to be combined with regular HTML elements into a page with the right layout, navigation bars, the company logo etc. ƒ
Use of and embedding of media content such as animation / movies. ƒ Content Requirements from client ƒ Accessibility Issues ƒ Legal Issues (Data Protection Act if applicable) ƒ Site scalability proposals ƒ Financial Issues ƒ Timescales Each page on the site should be described to show evidence of: ƒ Webpage screen shot ƒ Fonts / styles and colours used. ƒ Meta tags used and why they were employed. ƒ Navigation Issues. ƒ Use of text layout tools such as layers, tables or frames ƒ Use of images and if applicable how they were created. ƒ Use of multimedia and if applicable how created and embedded to page. ƒ Downloadable content. ƒ Advanced content ƒ Accessibility issues considered. Some other issues that need to be addressed in your portfolio include: Auditing issues http://www.e-zest.net/website_auditing.html Web hosting Your website must be hosted.

A2 UNIT 10 MULTIMEDIA TECHNOLOGY 
This unit is meant to demonstrate your understanding of the importance of multimedia technology and the use hardware and software in your given context. You must evidence of the design, description and presentation of a multimedia solution using a range of techniques including animation and video. You must show evidence of project management skills in your portfolio. The documentation you present in your portfolio should have a professional feel to it and should demonstrate an appropriate style for work at this level.

 YOUR COURSEWORK PORTFOLIO SHOULD BE BOUND APPROPRIATELY. 
In this Unit you must produce an interactive multimedia presentation including one piece of video or animation which includes a piece of edited audio supported by design sketches, storyboards and flow charts to meet your user’s specified requirements. It is strongly recommended that your portfolio should be presented using the following format and headings: Candidate Record Sheet This document should be signed by both you and your teacher. Contents Page If you choose to include a contents page with accurate page numbers it will significantly enhance your work. It will demonstrate a style commonly found in reports of this nature. Project Plan This is a plan that you should set out at the beginning of your work. It will be a programme of activities and resources you will use within a timeframe over the life time of the project design. You should use a recognised project management tool to document this. An example of a project management tool would be a GANTT chart (examples of GANTT charts can be found on the exemplar paper 7 Investigating Systems (a synoptic unit)). See CCEA website at http://www.rewardinglearning.com/development/qualifications/gce/docs/suppo rtdocs/appliedict_unit7_exemplar_paper.pdf Other Gantt chart examples can be found at: http://www.ganttchart.com/. It is also possible to use EXCEL as a project management tool – see http://office.microsoft.com/en-ca/assistance/HA010346051033.aspx


A2 UNIT 10 MULTIMEDIA TECHNOLOGY Multimedia Portfolio Presentation The multimedia presentation should ensure all information is presented in a structured, coherent, concise manner showing continuity. It should demonstrate the proper use of technical language showing an understanding of the design and production process. It should present a detailed analysis of the production task. Your portfolio should demonstrate that you know: • How digital technology works • What hardware and software to use in multimedia projects • How to design a multimedia project • The standard techniques used to create multimedia content • How to present multimedia content • What are the standard ways of working This unit will allow you to demonstrate team work. Each member of the team should be actively involved in the design and production process. You, as a team member, should be fully aware of what all other members of the team are producing for the multimedia project. Each team member must be responsible, at some time, of leading and directing the team. Each team member must produce their own distinct portfolio.

A2 UNIT 11 APPLICATION SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT 
This unit is meant to demonstrate your understanding of the importance of an e-portfolio, which you will design to support business functions in a given context. You must show evidence of how you used research, selection, evaluation and use of advanced features of software. You must show evidence of your understanding of the issues involved in the choice of software. In this Unit you must produce an e-portfolio containing evidence of ƒ A digital training resource which will help a new member of an organisation understand the vision, aims and structure of an organisation. ƒ An automated database containing data that can be used by a spreadsheet and word processor. ƒ A digital briefing resource that explains e-communication tools. ƒ A two page document (or 2 minute video) evaluating your own performance.

A2 UNIT 12 VISUAL PROGRAMMING
 In this unit you were introduced to the fundamental concepts of modern programming in a visual language. You must show evidence that you have undertaken tasks in which you ƒ designed and created programmes (event driven in nature) ƒ prototyped applications using storyboarding as a design tool ƒ interacted with your user ƒ used procedures and functions ƒ developed a user interface design and ƒ utilised the software to produce GUI applications. You will develop a single application or undertake a set of tasks to design a set of GUI applications which meet a set of user requirements. You will be required to examine and apply standard ways of working in this context. The documentation you present in your portfolio should have a professional feel to it and should demonstrate an appropriate style for work at this level.
 Your portfolio should demonstrate that you know: • How to design a visual interface; • How to develop a prototype through storyboarding; • How to use tools for building a GUI application; • How to package and distribute a system; • The importance of testing your user specified system; • Technical and user documentation requirements; • How to evaluate a user specified system; • What the standard ways of working are. 

A2 UNIT 12 VISUAL PROGRAMMING In this Unit you must produce a working system which has been designed to meet your user’s specified requirements. It should be produced using a visual programming tool. It is strongly recommended that your portfolio should be presented using the following format and headings: Candidate Record Sheet This document should be signed by both you and your teacher. Contents Page If you choose to include a contents page with accurate page numbers it will significantly enhance your work. It will demonstrate a style commonly found in reports of this nature. Introduction This section must describe the current system in detail and the requirements for the new system. Project Plan This is a plan that you should set out at the beginning of your work. It will be a programme of activities and resources you will use within a timeframe over the life time of the project design. You should use a recognised project management tool to document this. An example of a project management tool would be a GANTT chart (examples of GANTT charts can be found on the exemplar paper 7 Investigating Systems (a synoptic unit)). See CCEA website at http://www.rewardinglearning.com/development/qualifications/gce/docs/suppo rtdocs/appliedict_unit7_exemplar_paper.pdf Other Gantt chart examples can be found at: http://www.ganttchart.com/. It is also possible to use EXCEL as a project management tool – see http://office.microsoft.com/en-ca/assistance/HA010346051033.aspx Design Documentation You must use storyboarding and state the data requirements and output to be produced by your system. You should use detailed sketches/ storyboards to present a graphical representation of the proposed system. The storyboards should include relevant controls e.g. labels, text boxes, list/combo boxes, images, menus and toolbars. Navigation through the system should also be represented. Along with the actual storyboards, details of the modular design of the programs should be explained.

A2 UNIT 12 VISUAL PROGRAMMING Implementation You must show evidence of your implementation by including annotated screen dumps and code listings of the system you have built. This should be generated from user requirements. The initial prototype should only provide a snapshot of the proposed system, giving a flavour of the screens, navigation, controls used and output screens. The refinement of the prototyping should be carried as necessary taking into account user feedback each time. Forms should be fit for purpose, professional, original, intuitive, consistent and employ a variety of text, menus, controls and graphics.
There should be evidence of e.g. combo box, scroll bar, list box, graphics, check box etc. Processing and Code - students should use appropriate programming structures e.g. Sequence, Selection and Repetition, Case statements, For to Next, and Nested If statements. A number of user-defined modules should be evident. The entire code should be printed out in full. Use of control arrays can reduce the amount of code keyed in. Processing and Printouts – The programs produced should contain validation of controls, menus etc.. User Documentation This is a separate document which you will produce for a naïve user to allow them to use the system. The User Guide should be a separate document and have a title page and table of contents This naïve user will be assumed to have no knowledge of your system. This naïve user should NOT be able to amend or have access to raw data. For some advice on this see http://www.klariti.com/technical-writing/User-Guides-Tutorial.shtml You must also provide evidence that THREE users have tested your system using your user guide. You must also evaluate how your system meets its original objectives. This could be evidenced by a signed questionnaire.

A2 UNIT 12 VISUAL PROGRAMMING 
Technical Documentation This is a separate document which you will produce to allow a TECHNICAL user to maintain or upgrade the system. Technical Documentation is written for people will maintain the system once it is installed and being used. Remember - All systems evolve. This means that the user will need the system to do things better, faster or even in a different way. Some things may have even been overlooked or forgotten. The user will only realise that improvements need to be made once they start using the system. Maintaining the system means keeping it running well and doing what the user needs it to do. Technical guides may use technical language and system diagrams if they are needed. Examine http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technical_communication A technical Guide may include the following: ƒ Technical details such as the type of system being used – technical details such as type of computer system, RAM, printer etc. ƒ Explanations may include o how to load the software, upgrade a sub-system, make a user interface, add fields, validate and verify data, amend the database structure, fault find etc. o How to produce a query or report. o
How to edit a macro or change some code. ƒ You may also put in a FAQ section or contact details (email support address, web site support address, telephone support line numbers.) You must also provide evidence that THREE users have tested your system using your technical guide. You must also evaluate how your system meets its original objectives. This could be evidenced by a signed questionnaire. Test Documentation You should provide a comprehensive test plan with evidence that testing has been carried out. Test plans should include evidence of: ƒ Navigation ƒ Data capture ƒ Data manipulation ƒ Data output ƒ Reports produced A2 UNIT 12 VISUAL PROGRAMMING Evaluation This section is where you describe your solution and reflect on how it meets the quantitative user requirements specified at the beginning. It should comment on the effectiveness of the use of prototyping and this section should also report your recommendations for future improvements. You must also mention how your time management skills were used as well as the interaction between yourself and the user during prototyping when extracting and refining your user’s requirements. You should also discuss how your performance could be improved. ƒ
You should concentrate on your initial project management plan – did everything go according to plan – do you deliver when you said you would?– if not? - why not? – did things take longer than expected? – why? – were there any unforeseen events that slowed the project ?– what were they and how did you cope or catch up? ƒ You should reflect on the usefulness of the prototyping approach to system development. ƒ You should reflect on the future of the project – are there any enhancements that you could add later – give reasons for them. ƒ Statements such as ‘I thought I did well. There were no real problems at all’ should be avoided – it is unrealistic to expect everything to run smoothly. ƒ Statements such as ‘Everything was fine, but if I had to do it again I’d do it differently’ should also be avoided. It’s a contradiction in terms.


A2 UNIT 14 IMPLEMENTING A BUSINESS SOLUTION 
This unit allows you to develop a software system from a User Requirements Specification. You will design, develop, test, document and evaluate a software solution to a specified problem. You will be required to demonstrate project management skills and to appreciate all aspects of the systems development life cycle. You will be required to develop a software solution to a business problem taking into consideration the needs of the end user. You will be required to explore and select appropriate design methods. You will be required to develop, test, document and demonstrate your solution. You will examine and apply standard ways of working in this context. WHAT YOU NEED TO DEMONSTRATE. Your portfolio should demonstrate that you know: • How to use appropriate design methods to develop a software system to meet user requirements • How to develop a functional software system from the design specification using a recognised development tool • How to test the developed system • How to produce the documentation • How to evaluate the final system in terms of the User requirements • What are the standard ways of working

In this Unit you must design, develop, test, document and evaluate a software solution to a given problem. It is strongly recommended that your portfolio should be presented using the following format and headings: Candidate Record Sheet This document should be signed by both you and your teacher. Contents Page If you choose to include a contents page with accurate page numbers it will significantly enhance your work. It will demonstrate a style commonly found in reports of this nature. Project Plan This is a plan that you should set out at the beginning of your work. It will be a programme of activities and resources you will use within a timeframe over the life time of the project design. You should use a recognised project management tool to document this. An example of a project management tool would be a GANTT chart (examples of GANTT charts can be found on the exemplar paper 7 Investigating Systems (a synoptic unit)). See CCEA website at http://www.rewardinglearning.com/development/qualifications/gce/docs/suppo rtdocs/appliedict_unit7_exemplar_paper.pdf Other Gantt chart examples can be found at: http://www.ganttchart.com/. It is also possible to use EXCEL as a project management tool – see http://office.microsoft.com/en-ca/assistance/HA010346051033.aspx Introduction This section must describe the current system in detail and the requirements for the new system. Design The choice of design method applied to the development of a software system will reflect the nature of the problem under consideration. You must always consider the needs of the User and choose a design method that will help you to interact in an appropriate manner with the user of your developed system. You must show evidence that you understand how a range of design methods available e.g. Algorithms, Storyboards, Data flow diagrams, Data dictionaries can be applied in the development of a software solution. You should produce a specification of user requirements.

Implementation Based on the specification of user requirements you must produce your solution, suitably annotated. Testing You must should detailed evidence that you understand the importance of software testing. You must document: - How you have tested the functionality of a system; - How you have tested the User interface; - How you have tested the original specification against the final product; - How you have produced a test plan for a developed system; User Documentation This is a separate document which you will produce for a naïve user to allow them to use the system. The User Guide should be a separate document and have a title page and table of contents This naïve user will be assumed to have no knowledge of your system. This naïve user should NOT be able to amend or have access to raw data. For some advice on this see http://www.klariti.com/technical-writing/User-Guides-Tutorial.shtml You must also provide evidence that THREE users have tested your system using your user guide. You must also evaluate how your system meets its original objectives. This could be evidenced by a signed questionnaire.


 A2 UNIT 14 IMPLEMENTING A BUSINESS SOLUTION  
Technical Documentation This is a separate document which you will produce to allow a TECHNICAL user to maintain or upgrade the system. Technical Documentation is written for people will maintain the system once it is installed and being used. Remember - All systems evolve. This means that the user will need the system to do things better, faster or even in a different way. Some things may have even been overlooked or forgotten. The user will only realise that improvements need to be made once they start using the system. Maintaining the system means keeping it running well and doing what the user needs it to do. Technical guides may use technical language and system diagrams if they are needed. Examine http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technical_communication A technical Guide may include the following: ƒ Technical details such as the type of system being used – technical details such as type of computer system, RAM, printer etc. ƒ Explanations may include o how to load the software, upgrade a sub-system, make a user interface, add fields, validate and verify data, amend the database structure, fault find etc. 
o How to produce a query or report. o How to edit a macro or change some code. ƒ You may also put in a FAQ section or contact details (email support address, web site support address, telephone support line numbers.) Evaluation Your final system must discuss how you have met the User’s Requirements. You must also mention how your time management skills were used You should concentrate on your initial project management plan – did everything go according to plan – do you deliver when you said you would?– if not? - why not? – did things take longer than expected? – why? – were there any unforeseen events that slowed the project ?– what were they and how did you cope or catch up? You should discuss the relative success or failure of your final product. You must include detailed analysis of results, conclusions and recommendations. You must comment on how your own performance could be improved.